Planned Chaos, by Ludwig von Mises

Ron Manners says:

This is the first Mises book that I read, cover to cover, on a Perth-Adelaide flight, circa 1970.

It is available free online at the following locations:

1974 John Whiting speech

The following is part of the text of a talk given by Dr John Whiting to members of the Liberal Movement in South Australia on the 18th September 1974. (Dr John Whiting is chairman of the Movement for Limited Government.)

We are not living under normal conditions. This country is critically ill, and in an almighty mess — large numbers of young people taking to drugs; at a conservative estimate, some 25% of all adults showing some definite neurotic tendencies; mediocrity the order of the day; shortages of goods; incentives for brains, drive, skill and hard work virtually non-existent; strikes a daily occurrence; one man in four of the working population a bureaucrat probably producing nothing; government controls on the increase — individual liberty on the decrease; universities havens for academics who are often incapable of thinking rationally, so that many responsible parents are having grave anxieties about sending their children to these propaganda factories; taxation gone mad with incentive-destroying company tax, crippling provisional and progressive personal taxes, preposterous probate taxes and sales taxes like a bad dream — anything up to 50 separate taxes before the farmer’s wheat ends up on your table as a loaf of bread; inflation running wild; economic chaos looming; and political ignorance and apathy of an unbelievable degree. Continue reading 1974 John Whiting speech

Murray Rothbard: Chicago Economics versus Austrian Economics (1971)

Audio:

(The following 8000+ word transcript was difficult to make due to recording quality, tape deterioration and Rothbard’s speed. It is still a work in progress. The Mises Institute have an even more deteriorated recording and have put it online without transcribing. When I have time I plan to cross-check their recording with the one above from Ron’s library.) Continue reading Murray Rothbard: Chicago Economics versus Austrian Economics (1971)